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Ah, the iPhone. Roughly a third of American adults use them. In fact my analytics suggests there's a better than even chance you're reading this article on one right now.

After revealing the name of its soon-to-be-opened new headquarters in Silicon Valley, the iPhone maker is growing its footprint and workforce in Seattle—not far from the homes of Amazon and Microsoft.

Your core products or services are your lifeblood. They are what attract customers, drive revenues and enable a company to thrive. And, the better your products are, the more customers want it, the faster you grow and the further you distance yourself from your competitors. But, a common mistake I see with many entrepreneurs is a mindset that once the product is built, they can change their focus to other areas of the business, like sales or marketing. That mindset is their first flawed step right towards their grave.

Steve Jobs, Richard Branson, Michael Dell are household names to most entrepreneurs and consumers, and like you, they had to start somewhere. These empire builders had common traits that made them successful. They knew how to create a product that was unique to the marketplace, they had a product they believed in, and they provided a product customers wanted. That was the foundation to building their legacies.

The quintessential tech entrepreneur? Names like Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs and Sergey Brin come to mind. Each created a company, weathered some early bumps and turned their businesses – and themselves – into iconic brands.

Look out, Tesla. Apple is speeding into your rearview. The Cupertino, Calif., colossus is gearing up to release an electric car by 2019 and it’s hiring 1,200 more employees to get the show on the road, reports the The Wall Street Journal.

Most of the technologists I (Martin Zwilling) know inherently believe that the terms inventor and entrepreneur mean the same thing, so they are frustrated and surprised when they build their products and no business evolves. They don’t understand that most great entrepreneurs, including Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, had a partner with complementary skills on the business or technical side.

A lot of folks, on mornings when they wake up to find the Dow Jones Industrial Average off 1,000 points, breathe a sigh of relief that their fortunes, or prospects for a fortune, aren't tied to the whims of the stock market.

Growth hacking is failing most of us — because most of us don’t understand that what works for companies with a growing customer base doesn’t work for earlier-stage companies still looking for product-market fit; and vice versa.

There are millions of resources out there to improve every aspect of your performance, from books to videos to seminars and everything in between. Entire industries have been founded and thrived on self-improvement, and while that’s an important aspect of success, so are the things you should not be doing.